What can I do to reduce pollution in stormwater runoff?

Creating natural areas on your property can help reduce the quantity of stormwater runoff. Disposing of wastes properly, using the minimum amount of chemicals on your yard, and keeping your car well-maintained can reduce the amount of pollution that you add to storm water runoff. Additional things we can do to help include:

  • Report any non-emergency type pollution problem to your local government offices. For emergency pollution problems, such as major spills, call 911.
  • Never dump anything down a storm drain inlet. They flow directly to our lakes and streams.
  • Keep your leaves and grass clippings out of the streets so that they do not end up washing into the storm drain inlets.
  • Wash your vehicles on your lawn or at a car wash facility instead of in your driveway.
  • Keep your automobiles and your gas powered lawn mowers or blowers well tuned so that they are not dripping toxic fluids or emitting toxic fumes.
  • Do not use chemicals on your lawn before it is expected to rain, and try using organic or slow-release products, which are better for your lawn and for the environment.
  • Be conservative with pesticides and herbicides (weed killers) and try natural alternatives. Call your local Extension Service to find out more about natural pesticides.
  • Make sure your air conditioners are in good working order and not leaking harmful chemicals.
  • Install early closing toilet flappers and water conserving shower heads.
  • Lawns need less than an inch of water per week. If it rains an inch, do not water. Try using a rain gauge.

To report illicit discharges into storm sewer systems, call 931-520-5249.

Show All Answers

1. What is stormwater runoff?
2. What problems does it cause?
3. Why are the storm water and sewer systems separate?
4. What is nonpoint source pollution?
5. What is impervious surface area?
6. How did the city determine impervious surface area?
7. What can I do to reduce pollution in stormwater runoff?